Tag Archives: provider

Measuring the quality of life component in patient-centric care

Health status can be defined succinctly as, “the range of manifestation of disease in a given patient including symptoms, functional limitation, and quality of life, in which quality of life is the discrepancy between actual and desired function.” 1 Physicians spend their lives focused on the diagnosis of patient symptoms and, since clinical classification models are primarily structured for and by physicians, most models measuring variation in population health rely on reported diagnoses. Functional limitations, limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), are measured (either by the patient or the health professional) by a variety of tools utilizing a variety of scales.   Continue reading

Strong patient-provider relationships drive healthier outcomes

Maybe there is a way to measure quality so that metrics better represent outcomes that matter.

Harvard Medical School’s Center for Primary Care has been studying exemplars in primary care through a series of case studies in the past two years. Their article in Harvard Business Review describes the finding that good outcomes are related to the strength of relationship between the primary care provider and patient. This finding is strong and consistent across all primary care exemplars in their study.i Continue reading

WIFM? Engaging physicians in quality outcomes improvement

WIFM (what’s in it for me) is a common question in health care. With too many patients and not enough hours in the day, compounded by requests for additional documentation regarding medical necessity/continued need for inpatient admission, quality outcomes data can quickly fall down to the bottom of the provider’s to-do list.

Let me be clear on one thing. Providers do care about quality data and how their care is perceived, some more than others. Asking any surgeon to comment on a potential complication is fairly easy. But providers need better, more detailed information about how quality beyond operative complications impacts them and their practice of medicine. What follows is a partial list of WIFMs for providers from a quality perspective: Continue reading