Tag Archives: Potentially Preventable Events

It’s Time to Redefine an Achievable Triple Aim

This blog offers further commentary on the excellent conversation that Paul Levy began in his column, “The Triple Aimers have Missed the Mark.” In his blog, he provides a succinct definition of the Triple Aim as “improving the individual experience of care; improving the health of populations; and reducing the per capita costs of care for populations.” Continue reading

Incentives Empower Providers to Improve Care

For the last decade, we have been fortunate enough to work with many state Medicaid programs and commercial payers on reform efforts incorporating outcomes targets for health care providers. The outcomes targets we establish are collectively termed potentially preventable events (PPEs) and provide a direct link between the cost of adverse outcomes and provider payments. The big difference in using an outcome-based approach to incentivize healthcare improvements is that provider engagement requires a demonstrated improvement in the actual health of patients. Continue reading

Refining the Definition of Health Service Units Will Help Control Prices and Gain Value

In recent years there has been a great deal of attention on the variation in service volume across providers and regions. Our suite of tools, collectively entitled Potentially Preventable Events (PPE), has led our research group to engage with a variety of stakeholders in their efforts to minimize volume variation. This variation typically results from inefficiencies, poor quality of care leading to the use of otherwise unnecessary services or the overuse of services resulting from practice pattern. Volume is a sensible target for cost reduction efforts and, when detailed as variation across peer providers or regions, is hard to justify. Price (transaction price) comparisons are more complex but, arguably, have greater bearing on total U.S. healthcare cost. At least this is what we are told each year by the policy folks at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Continue reading