Tag Archives: AHIMA

ICD-10: One month in

October 1, 2015 has come and gone. I didn’t really expect everything to come to a screeching halt, as warned during the anticipation of Y2K. I did, however, expect that by the middle of this month, we would have some horror stories about claims issues with regard to the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10. I’m still waiting. I’m sure there have been individual issues, but scanning list serves, web sites, CMS, etc., I haven’t seen any systemic issues with regard to claims payment in the professional, Part B world. Insert sigh of relief here. Continue reading

HIMagine That! ICD-10 fallout?

Donna: Hey, Sue! We haven’t talked since AHIMA. Did you get back in time for ICD-10 go-live?

Sue: Yes, I was in my office, bright and early on October 1. I couldn’t wait to see how it was going to go!

Donna: Well, I talked to a lot of people at AHIMA and it was clear the general mood was one of excitement. Finally, we’re able to move forward with ICD-10 after all these years of preparing and practicing.

Sue: I heard pretty much the same thing. One HIM director captured it perfectly when she said, “Bring it on!” I think everyone was confident, anxious to get going and ready to deal with the fallout, if any. Continue reading

HIMagine That! Collaborating on ICD-10 Documentation

Donna and Sue are joined this month by fellow 3M HIS blogger Jill Devrick.

Donna: Hi Sue. How was the AHIMA-AHDI summit? Didn’t you give a presentation?

Sue: The summit was really good, and yes, Jill Devrick and I gave a presentation on how CDI professionals and Healthcare Documentation Specialists can work together to improve the content of the medical record in light of the transition to ICD-10.

Donna: So tell me more…

Sue: You know what, let’s get Jill on the line and we can both tell you about it… Continue reading

Documentation Quality: Time to Line up the Ducks

The Joint Commission’s (TJC) current “Quick Safety” article, intended to advise healthcare organizations about safety and quality issues, is about the potential risks when technology and human workflow practices do not ensure patient documentation is accurate, complete, and understandable. Although the title of the article is, “Transcription translates to patient risk,” the gist of the article is that documentation being captured via dictation and transcription, speech recognition technology, direct entry into templates, straight typing by providers, or any other method, needs to be reviewed with utmost care to protect patients from injury and death. Continue reading

The Oops Factor Part 2: Noncritical Errors

Back in September, I wrote a blog about documentation errors and listed various types of critical errors that could potentially impact patient safety, care, or treatment. Clearly, errors that can cause harm are the first and most important to detect and resolve. Some errors don’t carry such severe potential consequences, but they still impact documentation quality.

Why should we be concerned about noncritical errors if their presence does not hurt the patient? First, these errors can affect perception about the author and/or organization if they are not addressed and corrected, especially if frequent or habitual. No physician or administrator wants to be questioned in court concerning incomplete, inaccurate, or just plain sloppy documentation because it introduces doubt regarding the attention to detail and professionalism of the organization and individuals providing care to the patient. Continue reading

AHIMACon vs. Comic-Con: We All Have a Role to Play

Last week I checked in on Facebook from the AHIMA convention in San Diego. My brother, who attends San Diego Comic-Con religiously every year, decided to weigh in:

Brother: My San Diego convention is superior to your San Diego convention.

Me: My convention is more conventional than your convention.

Brother: I expect you’ll have better Cosplay, though.

Me: Lots of Clark Kent and Lois Lane types.

It turns out this exchange fit perfectly with the vibe at #AHIMACon14 over the following three days. I arrived at the Monday general session in time to see and hear several inspirational messages about how innovation and, as AHIMA CEO Lynne Thomas Gordon put it, “embracing reinvention,” are the keys to success in health information management. Continue reading

CDI and Document Creation: Aligning Goals and Processes

Last week I attended my first CDI Summit. As a specialist in the document creation process, I knew that I was going into the conference with a different perspective on healthcare documentation than most attendees, but I was hoping to see how the goals and processes of clinical documentation improvement (CDI) align with the goals and processes of documentation capture and quality assurance.

I was happy that all of the sessions I attended related in some way to how the documentation is being captured in health care, either through traditional dictation and transcription, speech recognition, templates, or direct data entry. On several occasions I heard the CDI mantra, “If it isn’t documented, it didn’t happen,” because the focus of CDI is on attaining accurate and timely documentation that reflects the scope of services provided to the patient. Continue reading

“Documentation is the beginning….not the end”

I wish I could claim this quote as my own! I attended the AHIMA CDI Summit in Washington, D.C. this week and our keynote speaker was Laura Zubulake. My two takeaways from her presentation were the quote above and the affirmation that we should always do the right thing…not the easy thing.

One of the more interesting presentations of the week was from a cardiologist who provided insights into the CDI and HIM query process from his perspective. He had an excellent grasp of what was needed for accurate coding–until that one moment. I am sure many of us have been there: listening to a presentation, engaged and learning until we hear something that makes us cringe. He described the following scenario: Continue reading

HIMagine That! Highlights from the AHIMA Clinical Coding Meeting

Donna: Hey, Sue – what were your takeaways from the AHIMA Clinical Coding meeting held in New Orleans?

Sue: I really enjoyed the presentation by Dr. Jon Elion. He offered great clinical perspective on some of the diseases that can cause the most difficult documentation and coding conundrums – you know, like malnutrition, encephalopathy, CHF, malignant hypertension . . .

Donna: So interesting! He noted that there is no specific code for hypertensive urgency. If this is documented and there is no current or impending organ failure, one should not query for malignant hypertension in this scenario – instead, it is just reported as unspecified hypertension.

Sue: Which presentation piqued your interest? Continue reading

Document Creation: A Key Player in Data Governance

I attended two AHIMA events this fall – the Health Information Integrity Summit back in September, and the Annual Convention and Exhibit in October. These events have prompted me to think about data governance – the people, processes, and technology that are put in place to create a framework for capturing data. My background in document creation workflows and technology makes me keenly aware of how quality issues can make or break the success of documentation processes further downstream in the cycle such as coding, analytics, and system interoperability.

I often hear the cliché “garbage in, garbage out,” being used to describe how bad content capture practices can lead to a myriad of problems when attempting to use captured data and documentation for decision making and quality improvement. Continue reading