ICD-10: One Small Step for Health Care—Politics Can Take a Hike

If no further weird politics intervene, we will be able to use ICD-10 codes for real, finally, beginning October 1, 2015.

This experience has been emotionally draining for everyone. For years now we have worked in good faith toward what should have been a modest, straightforward and totally un-newsworthy goal—upgrading an old transaction infrastructure. Imagine this headline: “Old Wiring in the Basement Replaced.” That’s about how exciting ICD-10 implementation should have been. Continue reading

Revenue Neutrality in ICD-10: How Will You Know?

No one likes surprises, especially when it comes to financial performance. In order to reduce unexpected results, many hospitals and payers have decided to address the issue up front. You can call it risk reduction, revenue neutrality, or negotiated reimbursement, but in all cases the goal is to reduce the financial impact ICD-10 has on your organization. Continue reading

Will Health Care Transparency Work? Four Unique Perspectives

Health care is not a commodity. Shopping for health care services is not like shopping for a refrigerator, a tennis racquet or a DVD. Identical commodities can be offered by numerous vendors and consumers can reasonably access their prices for comparison as an important element of their purchasing decision. Consumers, however, can’t (and shouldn’t) compare health services on price alone. Health care is a service, but one unlike most other services we use on a regular basis. Continue reading

Is Our Approach to Quality Measurement Getting in the Way of Quality?

The path to better population health outcomes is difficult–and our approach to quality measurement may be making it harder. Process measure improvement does not consistently lead to outcomes that matter, and narrow-focus outcome measures sometimes apply to a very small part of the overall population. Continue reading

Building the Bridge to Healthcare IT

Trust me when I tell you that, as a healthcare IT technologist, most of us are excited about your projects when we first learn about them. You may have noticed the occasional sigh or raised eyebrow, but now the reason why.

Transparency. Continue reading

The Client Experience Summit: It’s No Longer Just for Hospitals!

May 5-7 in Salt Lake City was a fantastic time. It has been three years since 3M acquired CodeRyte and it was great to see many CodeRyte customers attending this year. Additionally, we had a full Ambulatory training track. For customers that missed it, look for your invite next year and consider joining us. Continue reading

What Is Cost in Health Care?

Although cost is a common topic in health care, it is not commonly understood. As one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, similarly, in health care, one man’s cost is another man’s gain. Costs to a payer become revenue for a care provider, as do the co-payments and other shared costs paid by consumers. The perception of “cost” depends entirely on who is paying. Not only that, the definition of cost depends on who is measuring. And everyone measures it differently. Continue reading

HIMagine That! The 3M Client Experience Summit

Donna: Hi Sue! I had a great week at the 3M Client Experience last week! How about you?

Sue: Me, too! It was so nice meeting customers face-to-face and hearing about the cool and interesting things they’re doing in their organizations. Continue reading

Documentation Quality: Time to Line up the Ducks

The Joint Commission’s (TJC) current “Quick Safety” article, intended to advise healthcare organizations about safety and quality issues, is about the potential risks when technology and human workflow practices do not ensure patient documentation is accurate, complete, and understandable. Although the title of the article is, “Transcription translates to patient risk,” the gist of the article is that documentation being captured via dictation and transcription, speech recognition technology, direct entry into templates, straight typing by providers, or any other method, needs to be reviewed with utmost care to protect patients from injury and death. Continue reading

Budget Neutral Payment for Pharmaceuticals – Tying Value to Outcomes

We believe there are two core principles that should be adhered to when implementing payment reform initiatives. First, that measurement of performance change should be directly quantifiable in dollars where possible; and second, that performance change should directly translate into improved patient outcomes. We adhere to these principles by encouraging payment incentives tied to potentially preventable events – rate-based outcomes performance measures with clearly quantifiable costs. Continue reading