Category Archives: Quality Outcomes

Quality of care; pay for performance; quality-based reimbursement; case mix index; quality scores; quality report cards; data analytics; value-based purchasing; performance ratings; mortality rates; hospital report cards; POA; present-on-admission; HACs; hospital-acquired conditions; PPRs; potentially preventable readmissions; SOI; severity of illness; ROM; risk of mortality; healthcare reform; HealthGrades; P4P; potentially preventable complications; PPCs; state initiatives; federal funding

Why Primary Care Should Pay Attention to Continuity of Care

Reducing healthcare costs through better care delivery begs the question: “Where do we start?” When the goal includes something to the effect of “the greatest possible improvement for a population,” it is good to reflect on the body of evidence pointing to high performing population health outcomes.

The work of Starfield and others is instructive: High performing health systems have high performing primary care as their foundation. High performing primary care has four cardinal features:¹ Continue reading

Do You Want a Healthcare House of Straw or Bricks?

Anyone who has renovated a home while living in it should relate to the challenges of shifting to value-based payment. It is takes time, money and grit to redesign a house and maintain any sort of normalcy for the occupants. The transition from fee-for-service reimbursement to value-based payment isn’t a tidy process either. As with home renovation, having a blue-print and a project plan makes it manageable. Continue reading

Medical Care: When Do Harms Outweigh the Benefits?

Medical care produces both benefits and harms. There are risks associated with care delivered in the hospital, including infections, medical errors and delirium. There are side effects associated with medication and, ultimately, there are risks associated with all medical procedures. When a patient is suffering from a painful or debilitating illness, it is understandable how they might overestimate the benefits of medical care and underestimate its risks in an effort to obtain a cure or symptom relief. More worrisome is that some physicians may be poor estimators of risk. The medical community often ascribes to the adage that it is better to act than do nothing, whereas “nothing” may be in the best interest of the patient. Continue reading

Will Health Care Transparency Work? Four Unique Perspectives

Health care is not a commodity. Shopping for health care services is not like shopping for a refrigerator, a tennis racquet or a DVD. Identical commodities can be offered by numerous vendors and consumers can reasonably access their prices for comparison as an important element of their purchasing decision. Consumers, however, can’t (and shouldn’t) compare health services on price alone. Health care is a service, but one unlike most other services we use on a regular basis. Continue reading

Is Our Approach to Quality Measurement Getting in the Way of Quality?

The path to better population health outcomes is difficult–and our approach to quality measurement may be making it harder. Process measure improvement does not consistently lead to outcomes that matter, and narrow-focus outcome measures sometimes apply to a very small part of the overall population. Continue reading

Documentation Quality: Time to Line up the Ducks

The Joint Commission’s (TJC) current “Quick Safety” article, intended to advise healthcare organizations about safety and quality issues, is about the potential risks when technology and human workflow practices do not ensure patient documentation is accurate, complete, and understandable. Although the title of the article is, “Transcription translates to patient risk,” the gist of the article is that documentation being captured via dictation and transcription, speech recognition technology, direct entry into templates, straight typing by providers, or any other method, needs to be reviewed with utmost care to protect patients from injury and death. Continue reading

Budget Neutral Payment for Pharmaceuticals – Tying Value to Outcomes

We believe there are two core principles that should be adhered to when implementing payment reform initiatives. First, that measurement of performance change should be directly quantifiable in dollars where possible; and second, that performance change should directly translate into improved patient outcomes. We adhere to these principles by encouraging payment incentives tied to potentially preventable events – rate-based outcomes performance measures with clearly quantifiable costs. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Hospitals…Ethics in Reporting Quality Outcomes

Pardon the bad play on words, but “it was the best of hospitals, it was the worst of hospitals.” Within the past week I interacted with two healthcare organizations and had the chance to discuss not only how they report, but improve their quality outcomes. In order to protect both the guilty and the innocent, I will only state that both are large academic medical centers with similar services, physician leadership and quality organizational structures. In comparing the two organizations, the gargantuan differences in reporting frustrate me, and the ethics of the leaders involved in quality at one institution frankly disgust me. How can we accurately measure, and ultimately improve, quality outcomes if all are not “playing” honestly? And yes, I acknowledge that “gaming” in quality scores has been occurring for decades. But does that make it right?
Continue reading

Population Health Management and the Annual Physical Exam

Population Health Management (PHM) is the application of specific interventions and approaches within a healthcare delivery system designed to improve and maintain the health of a population. PHM strategies should be effective (lead to better outcomes), as well as efficient (achieve the best outcome at the lowest cost). As the U.S. healthcare system continues to promote value-based care and PHM, it’s critical that health systems address the most important issues that lead to the best outcomes. Continue reading

Present and Accounted For…Potentially Preventable Complications

We all know the phrase “First do no harm,” a philosophy that is a driving force in health care. In other words, if we do not do anything to improve the health of our patients during their stay, at least let’s not allow anything bad to happen to them on our watch. Continue reading