Category Archives: Quality Outcomes

Quality of care; pay for performance; quality-based reimbursement; case mix index; quality scores; quality report cards; data analytics; value-based purchasing; performance ratings; mortality rates; hospital report cards; POA; present-on-admission; HACs; hospital-acquired conditions; PPRs; potentially preventable readmissions; SOI; severity of illness; ROM; risk of mortality; healthcare reform; HealthGrades; P4P; potentially preventable complications; PPCs; state initiatives; federal funding

Analyze this! Administrative claims data or EHR data in health services research?

One of the ongoing debates in health services research concerns the relative merits of using administrative claims data versus electronic health record (EHR) data for research. Should one be preferred over the other? Some question the degree to which administrative claims data continue to be valuable for health services research given the growth of EHR systems. Continue reading

Transitional care interventions: Evidence supports more intense interventions

Responding to value-based-purchasing, provider groups across the US are implementing or tweaking programs to reduce unnecessary hospital readmission or emergency department visits. Much of this is stimulated by Medicare’s plans to move the bulk of their payment into new models and the current incentives around readmission reduction for beneficiaries with certain conditions. Continue reading

Bringing health care and nutrition closer together

Losing weight consistently makes the Top 3 for New Year’s resolutions. Closely related to this are pledges by Americans to exercise and eat healthier. According to a review of the most popular Google “how-to” searches made during the first week before and after New Year’s 2015, learning to cook healthier fare made the top 10, including kale chips (#2), lentils (#5), cabbage (#6), collard greens (#8) and broccoli (#9). Luckily for resolution makers, there are 3 developments in healthcare that will help them follow Hippocrates counsel to “Let medicine be thy food and let food be thy medicine.” Continue reading

Counting down the top 5 blogs of 2015

Happy New Year to all our readers! Before the ball drops in Times Square, catch up on five of our most read blogs of the year: Continue reading

Does anyone really believe quality scores change referral patterns or the doctors patients choose?

This question was posed by an audience member to speakers at the 3M Value-Based Care Conference. The answers were all “yes,” but not without qualification about how data transparency changes behavior.

Precisely, the question was, “Does anybody really believe that putting up a quality score changes referral patterns or makes a patient go someplace different?” The asker explained, “In New York, we’ve had the Cardiac Report Card forever and forever . . . I have never seen a badly reported cardiac surgeon come off that list or not do cases.” Continue reading

Copy-paste in the EHR

Should physicians use the “copy-paste” function to document in the EHR?  In his latest blog post, 3M HIS blogger Jeremy Zasowski uses a whiteboard to sketch out the pros and cons, and offers two case studies that get to the heart of the copy-paste issue.

Watch the video here.

Copy-paste in the EHR title screen

 

Continue reading

Some thoughts on risk measurement

One reader of my latest blog on segmenting health care consumers asked me if I knew of any tools to calculate a person’s chance of developing a particular disease. That question got me thinking again about the topic of risk in health and disease. I pulled a copy of John Last’s Dictionary of Epidemiology from my office bookshelf for a proper epidemiologist’s definition of risk:

“The probability that an event will occur, e.g., that an individual will become ill or die within a stated period of time or age. Also, a nontechnical term encompassing a variety of measures of the probability of a (generally) unfavorable outcome.”1 Continue reading

Lifestyle improvement: An untapped resource in population health management

The recent report describing a decline in new cases of diabetes is good news. An article about it in The New York Times does a nice job describing the lifestyle changes individuals have made to reduce their personal risk. The article is informative on several levels: Continue reading

Prescribing exercise to achieve the Triple Aim

It’s a fact: Americans have become more sedentary. This not only leads to greater susceptibility to obesity and chronic diseases, but also contributes to increased symptom severity for those with chronic conditions. Getting the entire nation off the couch and on their feet is a laudable goal for promoting overall health and quality of life. Given resource limitations, however, it would be best to focus on patient subgroups, particularly those that would experience the greatest benefit from physical activity while meeting the goals of the Triple Aim – better outcomes, improved patient satisfaction, and lower cost. Continue reading

The seven habits of highly successful care programs—and six examples

Last month, David Blumenthal, MD, director of The Commonwealth Fund, addressed a 3M conference in New York City on value-based care. He mentioned soon-to-be-released recommendations from his organization on effective models for healthcare improvement.

What he didn’t say was that the recommendations would be accompanied by a media crusade. In the past several weeks, The Commonwealth Fund has released a range of multi-media content advocating new models of care. Continue reading