Category Archives: Healthcare IT Implementation

Should providers embrace and adopt the “Cloud?”

Information technology planning in the 1990s and early 2000s involved forecasting capacity based upon detailed planning. Technologists would meet with business teams and supporting staff, and then whiteboard and spreadsheet the planned IT activity.

This effort resulted in vendor relationships, proposals and capital expenses, then waiting on equipment to arrive with the inevitable communication around delays due to backordered equipment and telephony circuits. No offense to my contemporaries of that time period, but as an industry we either under-provisioned, over-provisioned, or in rare cases, forecasted the right amount of capacity. The simple math is that 66 percent of the time, we technologists were not accurate in our ability to provide the services of infrastructure, capacity and performance. Continue reading

Using Scrum to tackle technical debt

I guess I may be part of a revolution and that revolution is called “Scrum.” Like many health IT leaders who are challenged with an ever growing backlog of work, there is no good, quantifiable way to prioritize that backlog, and it just keeps growing.

Enter what Scrum can do for healthcare IT. Continue reading

The Internet of Things in Health Care

A few weeks ago, my wife and I were watching an interview with Dr. Michael Roizen, who leads the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Roizen was describing his “7 Action Steps to a Healthier You,” one of which is “Walk 10k a Day,” where one tries to take 10,000 steps each day. Dr. Roizen explained that this 10K threshold seems to impart important health benefits, although the mechanisms aren’t fully understood. While my wife and I try to get out most mornings and walk for 30-60 minutes—at least that’s our intention—we had no idea how many steps we were taking. Continue reading

Looking for a Future in Healthcare IT? Think About a Career in Data

Data as a career may be a bit ambiguous. How about looking for a career in data modeling, preserving, securing, delivering and making data readily available?

Beyond the obvious solutions available within healthcare data to inform products and influence reform, there is a residual need for how to carefully steward and retain the data. Some refer to this as data governance. I call it simply, “a retention and capacity strategy in need of professionals.” Over the last five years, the healthcare industry has lost a tremendous amount of talent to the promise of “big data” and data driven analytics. The industry need is greater than ever to field a new set of talent. Continue reading

Building the Bridge to Healthcare IT

Trust me when I tell you that, as a healthcare IT technologist, most of us are excited about your projects when we first learn about them. You may have noticed the occasional sigh or raised eyebrow, but now the reason why.

Transparency. Continue reading

Three Strategies to Fund Sustainable State IT Data Projects

Escalating healthcare costs have persuaded many states to redesign their Medicaid payment systems. Most of them are also developing innovative uses of their client data to help reduce Medicaid costs and improve health. The projects range from alternative payment models to all-payer claims databases, often funded by grants. Continue reading

Why So Many Coding Software Releases?

Take a glance at your phone, or your laptop screen, or your desktop monitor. Do you see an alert about downloading a new software release or system update? We ignore them, we avoid them, and we put off installing them for days. When we finally get around to it, inevitably a new alert pops up with yet another set of updates!

Many of you may have wondered… why does 3M provide so many releases for the 3M Coding and Reimbursement System? Well, in this blog I hope to address the question of updates in a way that will help you understand how these releases impact you and which ones are critical for you to perform to keep your coding system updated. Continue reading

Health Care is Getting IT-Entrepreneurial

An interesting FierceHealthIT article just announced that New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) is renting space at a New York City-based technology “accelerator” called Blueprint Health, LLC.  Blueprint Health focuses on helping new companies or IT startups connect with healthcare organizations to aid them in developing products and bringing them to market. According to the article, NYP will run computer systems out of Blueprint’s offices and have an “innovation space.” NYP’s goal is to create closer collaboration between healthcare-IT focused startups and the hospital, ultimately resulting in new technologies being used at NYP. Continue reading

The Patient’s Side of Telemedicine

Last week, I had the opportunity to visit Good Samaritan Clinic in central Honduras. The clinic supports the primary care needs of 90,000 people within the municipality. Access to specialists is few and far between so Good Samaritan recently implemented telemedicine technology (computer, camera, imaging, and internet) to connect with specialists in the US. Access to these specialists is made available at no cost through the “Global Partnership for TeleHealth (GPT).”

Telemedicine is often defined as “the use of information and communications technology to deliver healthcare, particularly in settings where access to medical services is insufficient.” Better overall patient care and improved outcomes are cornerstones of telemedicine. As a result, many hospitals and health systems are deploying telemedicine as a way for rural patients to have access to healthcare services that they would not be able to obtain otherwise. Continue reading

Top 5 Report Creation Annoyances in Radiology

It’s about productivity and accuracy – anything else is a distraction

Guest blog by Dr. Arnold Raizon, MD, a physician consultant with 3M ChartScriptMD for Radiology.

One of my biggest frustrations as a radiologist is dealing with the quirks of the software tools I must use to create my reports. Some applications look like they were not really created from the ground up for radiology use, but merely a collection of patches over generic software that frustrate busy radiologists like me. Let’s examine in more detail some of the common annoyances that hinder radiologists’ ability to stay productive and, more importantly, how to address them.

Continue reading